Tag Archives: monsoon

Tracing the abode of celestial congregation- Kollur

While I was flipping through old photos of my college days, I was taken back in time to this so-called ‘Industrial trip’. This class trip consisted of trekking, pilgrimage, beaching and lastly, not to forget our industrial visit (only If time permitted, that was!). Basically, it was less of industries and more of place hopping. So here goes the first part of the so called ‘Not-so-Industrial-Trip’.

Although I had walked for miles to reach places during my school days, this was my first ‘Official’ trek! A trek in the ‘Kodachadri hills’ in Malnad region of the western ghats.. After a really long bus journey, we alighted at the Nittoor forest checkpost late in the evening. We got the permits at the forest checkpost for the night’s camping ahead, at the old forest guesthouse. We parked our bus there and got into the 4WD jeeps that were waiting for us since early evening. There is NO road from Nittor to the guest house and is only a muddy pathway. And in monsoon, it makes way for a deep trench kinda massive slush pool. This stretch can be covered by various modes based on each person’s interest. You can walk up or drive or ride.. The more adventurous people choose the latter; cycling comes with the greatest challenge. We chose the safest- The 4WD. But, driving through such terrain calls for great skill of steering control, lest have at least 7-8 people thrown off the road. That said, it was a crazy drive up the hill, until we reached the guesthouse in the darkness of 10~11.00.p.m.

After reaching the guesthouse, we could barely stand because of the strong winds. So, you can only imagine our next task of pitching tents.. We called off the idea of camping under the moonlight as we struggled to even hold the tents firmly in our hands. The winds were so strong. That’s when we had to camp indoors, at the guesthouse 😛 We had only a roof above us and no mats or sleeping bags. So we decided to pitch the tents inside the guesthouse hall for the rest of the night.

We woke up early next morning and started our hike up the Kodachadri hill. Our hike mainly consisted of two target activities- one was to reach the Shankaracharya mantapa at the peak, for sunrise and the second was to take a shower in the Hidlumane waterfall. We did not hire a guide as the organisers claimed their familiarity with the route. The sight all the way till the mantapa was beautiful and the sunrise and the Arabian Sea at the distant horizon just added up to the view! The climb was great, giving us an eyeful of the valley that was in all bloom with colourful wild flowers. After a brief walk, we reached the Mantapa. After spending some time at the peak, we readied ourselves for the descent.

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The Kodachadri hills- Overlooking the Arabian sea

The descend was towards the waterfall. With the descending gradient, we slipped, jumped down, clung onto wild creepers in the event of finding our way to the waterfall amidst the thicket of the forest. Somewhere, we had already started to realize that we were lost in the forest. The thumb rule of finding the way out of a forest is to follow a flowing water body. The organisers followed the sound of flowing water and we followed the organisers. We stopped by at a small cave like structure enroute, where someone had installed an idol of Lord Ganesha and offered some flowers. We prayed for our safe exit out of the forest and continued with our pursuit of the waterfall. So we finally reached at the source of the flowing water!

Sure it was a waterfall.. But ain’t the mighty one that we had thought it would be. It was a stream that was directed to a storage tank by the localites and the tank was overflowing forming a waterfall!! Neither the organisers nor the others knew how to react at our misadventurous pursuit. But we were all happy that we had found some pure water where we could fill our water bottles and ease ourselves out of the tiring hike that we had been through so far! We were now sure that the tank was there for a purpose and the pipe attached would lead us back to base point. And the descent continued, along the same stream to the base.

There is a small temple dedicated to Mookambika Devi at the base. It is believed to be the original temple that is tagged to the legend of Shankaracharya’s installation of the idol at Kollur. We reached the priest’s house near the temple where we had a simple-wholesome breakfast. After packing our stuffs from the guesthouse, it was time for us to head out to our next destination: Kollur.

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A view of the Arabian sea from the Kodachadri peak

People who prefer to trek further, can cover the Agnitheertham waterfalls enroute to Kollur Mookambika temple. But, having had enough in the quest of a waterfall, we decided to take the bus route. The bumpy drive continued until we reached Kollur, the small temple town known for the Mookambika temple, one of the Shakti peethas. This temple is said to have been developed by the Keladi rulers later in time so that pilgrims don’t have to trek up the overlooking Kodachadri hills to worship the goddess. Another legend has it that Lord Shiva appeared before Sage Kola and agreed to be present there in the form of Linga with his consort Devi. Along with Shiva and Parvathi, all other gods and goddesses are believed to be residing in a non-form in the Linga. Hence, Kollur is referred as ‘an abode of the entire celestial congregation’. We took a little time to offer our prayers and admire this beautiful little temple built in the typical Kerala style of architecture. Post that, we proceeded to the forest guest house where we had our stay booked for the night.

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The forest guesthouse

The forest guest house is located in a serene location in the middle of the ‘Mookambika wildlife sanctuary’ and on the banks of river Sowparnika. With banks I mean, just a couple of steps lie in between the guesthouse and the river. This river is frequented by spotted deers & leopards to drink water. And we were told that just the previous morning, a tiger was spotted on the same steps that we were standing on, at that time! The river flowed gracefully with the crystal clear water and the school of fishes enjoying their swim in between the tree roots that grew beneath. It was a SPECIAL place to go back again indeed! We cherished every moment of our stay there while being in harmony with nature in its purest form.

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The Idol of Mookambika being taken out as a part of the daily ritual

Soon, the dawn broke the next morning awakening us to another day reminding us of our journey to the next destination- Bhadravathi. It was the last day of our tour and that meant we had to do the most important part of this trip ‘Our Industrial visit’! That’s for another story altogether…

Of Hailstorms and the Waterlogged City – A Rainy Affair.!!

<22-May-2013>.

The Plan :
—>Finish work by 6.00.p.m
—>Reach home by 7.30.p.m
—>Leave home by 9.00.p.m
—> Reach the railway station by 09.45.p.m
—> Board the Chennai Mail for scheduled departure at 10.40.p.m
 
The Actual:
* Reached home at 08.30.p.m
* Left home at 09.15.p.m… And then the blog starts….

Half an hour behind plan, I thought I could catch the BMTC that passes through my road at 09.30.p.m. I kept waiting.. At 09.31.p.m, the bus appeared at the end of the road.. I crossed the road to reach the actual bus stop.. Bloody HELL..!! He drove straight rather than taking a right turn and stopping at where I was.. Time was running out and the last bus on that route had zipped past without me.. Now I had to rush to the other end of the village to avail a more frequent bus service..

09.45.p.m and still no signs of any bus or any rickshaws.. One bus seemed to appear then- no lights, no route number, no passengers.. But, it was a BMTC. I just jumped in without thinking too much and I bought a ticket to BEL circle(2 stops ahead)- This is a busy junction on a usual day with buses plying to Majestic every minute.. I landed there at 09.55.p.m. The wide roads looked rather deserted with just 2-3 commuters who also boarded some private transport headed towards Hebbal. There were 2 rickshaws: I proceeded towards one- “500Rs.” he said.(that’s like 3 times the actual fare) Like I had a choice, I was just about to step into the rick and a BMTC showed up at 10.01.p.m (Mark it.. Every minute counted.!!). With the roads seeming empty, in the worst case, my journey shouldn’t take more than 30 mins. I would still have 09 mins to board the train.

10.05.p.m, the bus had already reached Ypr-toll gate. I was happy.. 2 mins ahead, It was Malleshwaram and then- There was a cloud burst- heavy downpour from nowhere.. We all could hear ‘bang-bang’ ‘thud-thud’ noise from the bus roof, windshields- huge hail stones were falling outside.. The driver was almost blinded with the windshield wipers giving away.. He still managed to reach Central at 10.25.p.m. On a normal busy day, It takes about 5-10 mins to wade through the usual traffic congestion at this junction. I still had hopes.. But, thanks to the Metro construction, the road had come to a complete stand still. So the driver took a right turn and a round about route to reach Anand Rao circle.. Again passing through link road, A gutter’s walls had given up and it was a total chaos. Bikers were pushing their 2-wheelers across, 4-wheelers were floating around with water above their seat level. This water was upto our feet inside the mighty BUS.. Inspite of the spate, our driver crossed the street.. Further ahead, approaching Anand Rao circle, the roads were water logged. One had to be totally sloshed or had to just drive based on assumptions.. And then—> THUD..!! the bus came to a thumping hault.. A few passengers in the front seats leaned over their fellow commuters- the front wheels of the bus had gotten into a large pothole(or whatever it was) with no chances of getting out.

It was 10.41.p.m(Lala… my train.??) I took my bag and just got off the bus and began to walk.. Trust me: I did not know which street I was in and had no clue of the way to the station.. And its POURING cats & dogs and I have no umbrella..!! The water on the roads were upto my knees(I could not pull up my trousers further up)… 6 rickshaws appeared all at once- 5 declined to ferry me to the station, while the last one nodded a YES.. I just jumped in, “50 Rs..!!” he said for a basic fare ride. “It’s OK.. just take me ASAP..” I said. Poor fellow rode across with extreme caution and care because I was a lone girl(A rarity in Bengaluru to find such rickshaw-walas). Just as I figured out where I was (Shantala theatre), the auto stopped with a choke. Stranded in the middle of the road, the driver kept cranking the engine again and again.. I asked him if I had to get down, he said “No madam.. it is not safe for you. It will be fine. Please sit inside.” It was a pure scene of water ingress into the engine..

The time was 10.53.p.m. My point of worry now had shifted.. It was not about missing the train.. It was about what my next POA(Plan Of Action) would be..?

* I’ve been home alone for the past 2 months and no one back home to pick me up
* Even if there was some one, they couldn’t reach Majestic cuz the roads were all water logged. 
* No bus/ricks were available to home given the road conditions.
* It was not a safe idea even if some rick guy agreed to ferry me at 1000 Rs.
* No way I could reach Shantinagar bus station either, in the given road conditions & the time of the night.
* Travelling in a General bogie to Chennai = IMPOSSIBLE..

—> So, I was prepared to stay over at the station’s waiting room until next morning and then head back home…

10.56.p.m.: Poor guy is still cranking… All in vain. I stuffed a 100 Rs. note into his hand, told him that I was extremely sorry for causing this, thanked him warmly for the biiig favour and I began to run towards the station. I just kept running with no hopes, small hopes, faint hopes of the train waiting for me.. I tripped & then slipped.. And I fell hard on the road.. I picked up and continued to run..

11.00.p.m.– Bang on the clock- I’m on platform no.1 and the Chennai mail is beaming at me… “OH HELL.. YEAH..!!” Including the luggage, I was soaking wet till the last piece of my clothing.

I was fortunate for 3 reasons:
* Not hiring the rick at BEL circle lest be stranded at the open gutter part of the city for the rest of the night
* Not having washed away into some manhole in the water logged roads
* Late departure of the Chennai mail.

11.01.p.m.– The train hooted and thugged past the platform. Once the journey started, all my fellow passengers were getting ready to hit the slumbers.. Forget sleeping, I could not even sit since I could not dry myself up and had cramps all over.. But, it was the sheer joy of not having missed the train and making it to my friend’s D-day that made up for it all…

Day tripping in Nature- the Mysore Circuit

The initial plan was to leave before sunrise so that we could see the birds at the Ranganathittu Bird sanctuary before they left their homes for the day’s chores. However, a flat tyre and multiple pit stops added up to late arrival at the Srirangapatna-Yelwala bypass. This led to a few additions and deletions in the original plan so that we could see the birds when they returned to their nests late in the evening.

List of places covered:
Gaganachukki and Bharachukki waterfalls
Talakadu
Kaaranji kere in Mysore
Ranganathittu Bird sanctuary

Details of the trip:

As per the new plan, we headed to Gaganachukki and Bharachukki waterfalls. After a nice long drive through the green paddy fields and rusty countryside, we reached Shivanasamudra. This is one of the island towns formed by river Kaveri through its course. This is where Asia’s first hydel-power project was set up, commissioned by the then Diwan of Mysore- K. Seshadri Iyer; in order to supply electricity for mining at Kolar Gold Fields. River Kaveri plummets down at two places, a couple of kilometers away from each other and then merging together again. The beauty of the twin waterfalls is truly mesmerizing. If you’re seeking for some thrill, coracle rides are available that takes you closer to the spot where the water drops. But we did not want to take the risk of venturing into the water without a life jacket. At least, not after we heard someone say that the water was 1000 feet deep at some point. We weren’t not sure of the exact depth of the river, but certainly did not want to take a chance!

Gaganachukki- The western branch of river Kaveri
Gaganachukki- The western branch of river Kaveri

The sun was approaching his highest point by this time, and hence we decided that we should be heading towards our next destination- Talakadu. Kannadigas have all grown up listening to the story of the curse of Alamelamma. It is believed that her spell turned this once prosperous town to a sand desert. As a student reading history in school, I had always been intrigued to visit this place and see the romance between the sand and the temples during different seasons. However, the excitement that we had when we started to this place soon died when we arrived there (in fact, it got buried deep under its sands). Given the poor rainfall, less waters and hordes of tourists over the weekend, the place was had gathered so much filth and poop everywhere. There was an unbearable stench that had spread around. The river was shallow and looked stagnant and unappealing. Yet, we did manage to go for a coracle ride which was definitely not worth the buck. The place was a total turn off…!! We lost our interest to explore the famed temples of Talakadu and left the place (I did visit the historically important temples on a later date though).

Bharachukki- The eastern branch of river Kaveri
Bharachukki- The eastern branch of river Kaveri

We wanted to reach the highway back again but lost our way at some point. Without being able to connect to the highway, we just kept driving on some narrow road through the countryside. After the frayed trip to Talakadu, this drive through the rustic countryside was somewhat a deal breaker and a feast to our city bred souls. After a bit of driving around and just when we thought we had reached the highway, we realized that we had in fact reached Mysore…!! Mysore city was never on our itinerary when we left home that morning. We were extremely hungry and hence decided to feast at a nice restaurant in the city itself.

Some friend suggested us to visit Kaaranji kere in Mysore where we could do some birding. Around 3.00.p.m, we headed there- This was in fact the highlight of the trip- though unplanned, it came as a treat to us. We took a boat ride around the lake where we spotted several migratory birds. Not in large numbers, but many in varieties. It surely is a haven for the bird lovers. I pitied myself for not being able to identify what birds most of them were. I’m not an enthusiast of zoos as these places are where animals and birds are kept in enclosures. But, if you are around with kids, this place is good as there is an enclosure here as well that hosts many native birds, a few animals and reptiles.

The birds at Karanji kere

So, finally by 5.00.p.m, we headed out for what we had come all the way– Ranganathittu Bird sanctuary. It was the time when all the birds returned to their nests… We were there for sunset. We then took a boat ride around the small islets where thousands of birds have made their homes. The trees looked amazing with the birds and the water looked equally dangerous- with crocodiles swimming right past us… Again, we spotted a lot of different birds since it was the peak of the migratory season.

The winged hosts on the islet
The winged hosts on the islet

With a pleasant sunset ride in the river, a long day tripping in the Mysore circuit came to an end. Although most part of the day was unplanned, it was a weekend well deserved.

Dos & Don’ts for a Monsoon Trek

I’m just back from the monsoon trek to “The DudhSagar” falls… Well this one is which I had circulated just before the start of the trek- but did not find time to update in between all the excitement…

Since, I’m back now with more excitement than what I had left, some more updates to the list circulated before the start of the trek..!!

Do’s:

  • Shoes or floaters: Remember it is a monsoon trek in the Western Ghats.. So you might as well not end up spending 2 days with your feet soaking in wet shoes or walking bare feet and wind up with painful cramps.. None of us are going to carry you for the rest of the walk anyway, we will already be burdened with sufficient baggages to carry. So choose your footwear wisely or else, be prepared to be stranded along the railway tracks
  • Carry your own torches- else find your own way out of the numerous tunnels that we are going to encounter
  • Carry your own towels- Phuleeezz… no compromise and sharing on this one- come what may!!
  • Carry sufficient food for 2 days. Though this one is not a mandate! For all the meat eating fellas: you have ample number of leeches to binge on and a golden opportunity to taste a wide range of human blood. For those of you who are vegans: worry not, there will be twigs, barks and leaves all around us.
  • Own water bottles- or else we’ll push you into the mighty “Sea of milk” – the picture that you have been admiring with your jaws dropped everytime it is circulated.
  • Optional: raincoats / umbrellas or get wet in the rain totally- for you will not get such a pure rain water back home in the metropolis

Don’ts:

Dare not to forget the above..!!

Now the updated version:

  • In addition to the above points: Please carry extra cash- lest be mobbed by the railway police who will catch you and try to buckle you up in the name of causing public nuisance just for keeping the light on for extra few minutes..!!
  • Dare not to talk back to the police even though you are blamed for no fault of yours..!! You will have to spend the night at the police station instead of the train..
  • Carry tents to stay- don’t go just by a word of mouth, be prepared for the worse- You might have to get drenched in the pouring rain the whole night if someone had told you about a shelter.

Monsoon retreat- Jog falls

‘Jog’ is a charmer on all Karnataka tourism promotions. Why not? It’s the second highest waterfall in India after all! A glimpse of the mighty Jog at least once in a lifetime is an unwritten rule for every person born or living in Karnataka. And why not see it take a plunge in all its might? This exclusive visit could happen in no better time than the monsoons. So, my mother, brother and I planned this weekend trip to see the Jog. such that we could reach Shimoga by 6.00.a.m.

Our itinerary:
Day 0: Leave Bangalore to Shimoga (Overnight bus)
Day 1: Shimoga to Sagara (local transport), visit Linganamakki dam and hydroelectric project, The Jog falls, Tyarekoppa Lion & tiger safari. Return from Shimoga to Bangalore (overnight bus)

The details:
When we reached Shimoga in the morning, it was pouring not just cats & dogs, but also cows & buffaloes. A jeep’s ride had been arranged by my mother’s colleague to take us from Shimoga to Sagara town. The rains were so heavy that we could barely see the road ahead. With that, we would fall into just every other pothole that was covered under the flooded roads. Finally, we had managed to reach Sagara, the nearest accessible town to Jog falls.

Once there, we thought to see the Linganamakki Hydroelectric project that falls on the way to Jog. There also used to be a cable car ride down the reservoir that we were interested to go on. Unfortunately for us, our visit was timed just about when permission to visit the project was cancelled for some security reasons. Nevertheless, the view of the Linganamakki dam and the scenery around almost evened up for the miss.

Views of the Sharavati project around Jog falls
Top: the view of Sharavati valley; Below: The Linganamakki dam

And then, with an uphill drive of about six kilometers, we reached the place which was the sole motive of our travel from Bangalore. “The Jog”!! But, there was more disappointment awaiting us on our arrival. It was something that caused us total dismay…!!! The clouds paired up with thick mist had enshrouded the waterfalls completely. And our entire surrounding had just blanked out with mist. There was absolutely nothing in front of us except the mist and more mist… To top it all, it was raining cats and dogs. There was no Jog, nothing. ‘What an unfortunate day for us’, we thought and decided to return after a futile wait.

We turned our backs and started to walk towards the jeep with a heavy heart. As we did, I just happened to turn back and check on our luck with the waterfalls. And yes…. we were LUCKY…!! The mist was slowly clearing out… And we could faintly spot the Sharavathi streaming down in full action.

As we stood for two minutes more, the view was then all clear: The Mighty King (Raja), the Graceful Queen (Rani), the Thunderous Roarer and the Storming Rocket – YES… We saw them! We felt a great sense of achievement, very contrary to what we had felt just a couple of minutes ago. While we got some nice clicks, the mist enclothed the falls, back again. We waited for it to clear out to capture a few more photos because this time, we knew that the action was repetitive.

Jog falls in monsoon
Jog, from different view points

After a while we walked around to get different views of the falls. We went to the top of the waterfalls, walked down closer to the bottom of the waterfall, locatiosn from where we got the side view of the Jog, and so on… It was quite an adventure in itself to get around these difficult spots, especially considering the heavy rains and the slippery path. But, the excitement of getting to these locations was all worth the risk! After having an eyeful and heart full of ‘The JOG falls’, we decided to say good-bye to the place.

On our way back to Shimoga, we visited ‘Tyarekoppa Lion & tiger safari’. Along with spotting a lot of deer, sambars and peacocks, we also counted on the big cats like the lion and tigers on a safari ride. It wasn’t a typical safari you would have in the wild, but it was more like taking a ride inside a fenced enclosure. But, it is a well maintained place and great if you are travelling with children.

Tiger safari near Shimoga
Roarrr, a tiger at the safari

And that was all the time we had with us. We had almost reached the end of a fun day-Sunday and we boarded the bus back to Bangalore at night. We had to gear up for the crazy week that was awaiting us…

Conclusion: An experience of the monsoon in the western ghats and a glimpse of the Jog in the monsoon are retreats that should go into the bucket list of everyone visiting India.