Tag Archives: Indian traveler

The Great Indian Restaurant Festival- 2019

If there’s one thing on this planet that knows no religion and no language, it HAS to be food! It can bind anyone across any boundaries.. While the world recently went bananas about the pricing of a pair of bananas at Rs.442, you dont have to worry about feasting at a luxury hotel. You can now get a healthy breakfast or even a grand buffet for the price of Rs.442.

Are you that foodie waiting for some pixie dust so that you could binge on that expensive buffet on your bucket list? Now, you can feast at any restaurant all of this month, without worrying about how much it is going to weigh on your wallet. Be it a casual snacking out with friends, a date over a cup of coffee or a lavish dinner with family..

Make this August a festival time for your taste buds, tummy and your wallet. ‘DINEOUT’ is back with its 4th edition of the Great Indian Restaurant Festival. With India’s largest dining out platform- ‘DINEOUT’, you don’t have to worry about shelling out big bucks to grab it at a restaurant of your choice. What can get better than relishing your favourite food? It has to be availing your favourite food at half the price. With the Great Indian Restaurant Festival running all through the month of August, I definitely call it the #MonthOfMore. Why? You may ask. That’s because DineOut is giving a whopping flat 50% off on food, drinks, buffet or the total food bill! Annd….. There is no minimum or maximum price limit to avail the offer. That means I can eat more of what I love.

Or are you looking for some mid-week motivation? Then, Dineout will be running Flash Sale during GIRF on every Tuesday and Thursday. Get Deals at just Rs.11.

Trying new food and restaurants has always been an essential part of my travels. With travel plans set for almost all my weekends this monsoon, I’m eagerly looking forward for the #MonthOfMore. With over 8000 top restaurants from across India participating in this festival, my cravings to try out new cuisines, food at new restaurants is sorted for the whole of August. This means, I’m gonna have more food, more happiness, try more restaurants, enjoy more good vibes and win more prizes and at the end, save more for another travel 😉

How to get this discount?
Download the DineOut app (Click here) and reserve your table today. Limited seats available. Bookings now open!

Participating cities:
DelhiNCR, Mumbai, Bangalore, Kolkata, Chennai, Hyderabad, Pune, Ahmedabad, Goa, Jaipur, Chandigarh, Lucknow, Indore, Ludhiana, Nagpur, Kochi, Surat.

Festival Dates: 1st August to 1st September

Well guys, Or why not just host me at your city for a meal? 😉

Taking travel inspiration from busy bees

Aren’t honeybees good inspirers to travel? In a lifespan that’s as short as just a few days, they find a new place every day, explore a new flower every minute and taste new nectars on every flight! All this while still performing their assigned duties without having any complaints. Living a sweet life while being as busy as a bee!

It was curiosity that led me to learning about bee-keeping. This curiosity was a summation of multiple experiences accumulated through the years of childhood. I have been raised by my grandparents where honey has been an essential part of my life. We used it as a dip for breakfast and as a rice-mix for lunch, as an energy drink with hot water or even as a medicine with brandy or pepper corn. And yeah, stashes of several bottles went packed as souvenirs to guests who visited home and to friends who lived far away. You can call this honey with adjectives like pure, organic, handpicked, homemade, etc. ‘Coorg honey’ it was, after all!

Grandpa was personally enthusiastic about this particular hobby of his. I was often smitten with curiosity when he returned home with either a swollen face or with swollen hands. When I went nearer to him to check for his condition, he would only greet me with a warm smile and a piece of honeycomb dripping with fresh nectar. While at home, he would be busy with his bees in 75+ boxes that were kept around the house. It used to be a festival day for the family when drums of honey used to be extracted from his boxes all by himself. While at his favourite place- the Abbi estate, it was customary for him to have a daily look at this massive ‘Honey Tree’ as we called it, the single large tree where bee hives were formed annually. It was the family night out, an annual event that we all looked forward for. Honey tappers from a specific tribe called ‘Jenu Kurubas’ used to be called in, to climb the tree in pitch darkness on a no-moon night. The family camped in the darkness at midnight on the damp ground of the coffee estate with the rustling sound of the waterfalls in the background. While as a kid, I was amused with the spectacle of blue lights falling down from that tree, only as a grown up adult I realize the lights were indeed bees that were falling down after being smoked up in the process of honey tapping. And not to forget some odd days when he would pick out snakes from mud crevices that he had put his hands to collect honey from. And then there were days, when we made friends over a bottle of honey. These were customers who came to grandpa’s makeshift shop at Abbi falls with their unique ways of testing the quality of the honey sold there! Each customer, a unique character and every conversation, a story in itself.

For me, adding this new dimension to my travel stories was more of an emotional journey.. With the passing away of Granpa, the charm and life that his favourite place held too passed. The ‘Honey Tree’ eventually saw the ground leaving our family to buy honey from the market. Having relished the finest nectars from high tree trunks, deep mud crevices and those handpicked from the several bee boxes kept around the house, our family like all others are really not sure of the quality of those available in the market. That’s when this thought of setting up my own bee box struck me along with traveling in pursuit of knowledge sharing. These things led to me developing an interest about learning about honey bees and eventually respecting these tiny creatures more and more. I think being born in a community of nature worshippers gives me an instant connect with things that are natural and essential for our existence. Home is where primary and the most essential education starts and for me, Grandpa has been the main reason for one of the finest childhood lessons and home education I have picked up.

Albert Einstein said, “The Earth will come to an end in just 4 days if there be NO honeybees on this planet.” Honeybees are such an important part of our very own existence on this planet, Save them! Get in touch with an expert before you get that beehive removed from your concrete dwelling. Alternatively, get in touch with me for I would be more than willing to give a talk for awareness in your community. I signed up for a workshop to learn this art of bee-farming, and a certification came as a bonus. I did my course with ‘HoneyDay Bee farms’ who are thorough professionals and extremely knowledgeable in the field. They work with farmers right from the installation to extraction to marketing thus assuring you a 100% purity in their products. Go try them out!

The Malaysian Bucket List

The Malaysian travel has been in my mind for quite some time now, However it is not materialising, all thanks to the lack of the right organiser… While most of my friends and acquaintances have visited this small yet beautiful country, I’m not quite convinced with the places they have visited in their bland agent made itinerary covering the usual and the expected spots of Malaysia. Come on..!! This place has LOT MORE to offer.. lot more to explore.. So here goes the top 5 must do things I choose which wants me to go there…

1. A day out exploring the rainforests of Sabah with the endangered Orangutans at the Sepilok Sanctuary: – The orangutans are the two exclusively Asian species of extant great apes. These primates are only found in the rainforests of Borneo and Sumatra.

2. Cave exploring at the Mulu Caves National Park: This place is home to world’s largest cave chamber and one of the longest networks of caves in the world which is capable of accommodating forty Boeing 747 airplanes. The world’s longest canopy walk and seeing the cave swiftlets swarming out into the jungle in great clouds every evening would surely be an experience of a lifetime.

3. Scuba diving the World war II shipwreck sites at Pulau Redang Island: This place is home to about 31 finest dive sites including 2 ship wreck sites and a black coral garden..

4. Waving a ‘Hai’ to the toothless 130-year-old croc at the Teluk Sengat Crocodile farm: This place is a home to over 1000 salt water crocodiles and a nice place to study the habitat of these reptiles.

5. The colourful Putrajaya International Hot Air Balloon fiesta: Over 21 countries participating in this event makes it even more special and the name hot air balloon itself gives me goosebumps in excitement….

So now, for the adventure traveller… go there and explore… there is much more that this little island country has to offer.. I choose to re-quote from the contest website: Celebrate, Explore, get Inspired and Escape into a Truly Asian Paradise! 

Malaysia Tourism
Malaysia Tourism

I am participating in the MalaysiaJao Blogathon Contest in association with BlogAdda.com.

The Great Indian Western Ghats- To Save or to Not Save ??

There is much ado about the Western Ghats getting tagged as a World heritage site by the UNESCO.

So, like everyone around me here, I too am excited about sharing my views on it.

Firstly the stronger points for consideration:

  1. The western Ghats is home to very rare species of flora & fauna- many snakes, frogs, birds etc. are critically endangered and also unique only to these Ghats.
  2. These ghats stop the wind from the east and bring rainfall to the south.
  3. The major rivers of the South are rain fed and originate here.
  4. I being an ardent nature lover would definitely support to save the ever lush green ghats.

Now, the points not to consider:

  1. There are a no. of tribes living in these Ghats like the Soligas, Kurubas, Maleya-kudiyas etc who will all be forced to vacate the forests and will be disturbed from their natural habitat though the government may promise them of providing alternate homes.
  2. The Coorgs (Kodavas)- by themselves are a very small community fighting hard against the “Jamma Bane” issue and now have yet another blow. Many localites holding lands in the identified areas will be forced to vacate and this will inturn force them out of Coorg.
  3. Myself being a hardcore Kodavathi, I would never be able to take this by my stride.

And now, the strongest of them all:

  1. The Ghats are a rich source for mining, timber and a major hub for tourism leading to severe deforestation in the name of building resorts, nature sports and the likes.
  2. It is important to consider that our beloved elected representatives are frequently in the limelight for the mining scams. The major share of resorts in this region are owned by big names and are tucked away deep in the core area of the jungles which compete for providing the best tiger spotting, elephant spotting, wild hunting, etc. etc, activities for their guests. So there is a valid point for these scamsters to fight against the prestigious tag.
  3. The heritage tag limits the human entry to most regions. Let alone restrictions on activities like trekking, hiking etc. just walking around this place without knowledge would lead to high penalty.

But, what if this has an impact on a Coorg’s lifestyle: the tag has come as a much needed  respite for a nature lover like me. We are Coorgs at the end of the day. We have lived our way through thick jungles, heavy downpours, deep dark nights, wild animals in our porticos. And that’s the way we enjoy our life at it’s best. So we can definitely live strong with thick jungles. We want our Green cover to be saved…!!

I am frustrated of being helpless and just a mute spectator watching the depletion of green cover in the name of development. I can hardly see any development in my area other than the fact that big names (let me say powerful people) are buying properties by offering good money and settling down in Coorg, becoming stake-holders in resorts etc and turning all their black money white.

I used to eagerly wait for the rainy season to start so that I would get my monsoon holidays while I was in school. And now, I am even more anxious that this rainy season may pass by without even seeing a “rainfall”. Yes, only conservation of these ghats can bring us the rains that we need.

I am frustrated with the fact that the place where is grew up catching little fishes and crabs with my cousins as a little girl beneath big boulders is now nothing but a fully concrete platform for the tourists to rest on.

What I once knew as a beautiful waterfall and a place where my grandpa gave me my swimming lessons is now nothing but a pool of sewage flowing from the town littered by ruthless tourists. The stench of this mess gets tears streaming down my eyes everytime I stand on the very same concrete platform and try to recollect the good old greener and cleaner grandpa days…

The Bramhagiri hills
The Bramhagiri hills

And here I sum up…:

Give me some sunshine… give me some more rain….
Give me another chance… I wanna grow up once again…
I want more rains….. I want to re-live my grandpa times…
PLEASE SAVE THE WESTERN GHATS..!!!